Upcoming Semester

Fall 2019 Courses

ASAM 082. Racial Politics of Teaching.
K. Yep & C. Fought, PZ, MW 1:15-2:30 p.m.
This class examines how race and ethnicity are constructed in schooling from sociological, linguistic, and ethnic studies standpoints. Specifically, we will discuss how race and ethnicity are constructed in schooling and ways teachers/educators may refine their pedagogies in relation to race and ethnicity. Students will do a research project.

ASAM 086. Social Documentation and Asian Americans.
K. Mak, PO, F 1:15-4:00 p.m.
Viewing of films and other documentary forms by Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) for critique and discussion. Basic instruction in use of digital video technology to document social issues relevant to Asian American and Pacific Islander communities. Community- project.

ASAM 088. Thich Nhat Hanh: Interdependence, Ecology, and Healing.
K. Yep, PZ, TR 9:35-10:50 a.m.
This course is an introduction to the relationship among Thich Nhat Hanh’s Engaged Buddhism, ecology, and society. In doing so, it provides Thich Nhat Hanh’s perspective on ecological and social thought and an ecological and social perspective on healing from environmental factors in Asian and Asian diasporic communities. We will explore how Asian and Asian diasporic Buddhists view nature and the environment to address healing in the context of historical trauma such as the war. Through critical pedagogies and community engagement project with a partner in Vietnam and in California, we will explore the meaning and value of this way of viewing and interacting with the natural world to create healing from ecological social determinants of health. This class counts toward the Intercultural Studies, Social Responsibility Praxis, and Asian American Studies – Communities requirements. This course is a discussion class and your preparation for class discussion is critical to its success.

ASAM 101. Introduction to Asian American Studies (half credit).
T. Honma, PZ, W 2:45-4:00 p.m.
Introduction to the field of Asian American Studies, with a particular focus on its institutional and interdisciplinary configuration at the Claremont Colleges. Topics will include Asian American racial formation, campus activism, faculty research, cultural and community politics.

ASAM 125 HM. Introduction to Asian American History: 1850-Present
A.Flores, HM, TR 9:35-10:50 a.m.
This survey course examines the history of Asian immigrant groups and their American-born descendants as they have settled and adjusted to life in the United States since 1850.  We will explore issues such as the experience of immigration, daily life in urban ethnic enclaves, and racist campaigns against Asian immigrants.  In addition, this course utilizes an ethnic studies framework that requires students to critically explore other themes such as class, community, empire, gender, labor, race, sexuality, settler colonialism, and war from the perspective of Asian Americans.

ASAM 128. Body Art in the Diaspora.
T.Honma, PZ, MW 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.
Course introduces students to various body modification practices, with particular focus on regional developments in Asia, Pacific, and America. Key issues include: identity and community formation; agency, power, and social control; colonialism and post-colonialism; cultural property and appropriation; global circulations of bodies, aesthetics, and labor.

ASAM 189A. Music in Asian America.
Staff, PO, M 7:00-9:50 p.m.
This course addresses the cultural politics of Asian American music. We will explore the role of diasporic expressive culture in shaping racialized identities and emergent political formations. The “Asian American” will be broadly defined. Expanding the rubric of conventional East Asian American categories, we will examine South/Southeast Asian American musics and cross-racial alliances. Afro-Asian encounters will be of particular focus. This class incorporates a substantial community-based ethnographic research project. No musical training necessary.

ASAM 190F/190HPO. Asian American Studies Senior Seminar: Applications, Analysis, and Future Directions.
S.Goto, PO, W 1:15-4:00 p.m.
This is the capstone seminar for senior Asian American Studies majors (minors optional). The seminar is designed to bring seniors together to discuss and assess their understanding of Asian American Studies practice and theory at the Claremont Colleges and beyond. We will engage in minor research activities, read & analyze provocative books and articles, and revisit key issues & controversies.

ENGL 161. The Futures of Asian/America.
W. Liu, SC, TR 9:35-10:50 a.m.
This course explores speculative imaginations of Asian/American futures, covering works of classic science fiction, contemporary popular culture (including films), and newer work in “slipstream” or “mainstream” literary science fiction. Central to our exploration will be the question of how Asian/America is imagined as a multiply-contested site of future (hyper)modernity, even as Asia is imagined as place mired in a timeless past. Covering works by authors such as Chang-Rae Lee, Ted Chiang, Karen Yamashita, Charles Yu, Linda Nagata, Larissa Lai, and others, we’ll explore texts that speculate on transnational futures in relation to imperial pasts, on ecological disasters both global and local, on artificial intelligence and the “post-racial” future, and more. The course will pay particular attention to questions of racial formation, gender, sexuality, and the specific material histories of Asian/Americans.

JPNT 177. Japanese and Japanese American Women Writers.
L.Miyake, PO, TR 2:45-4:00 p.m.
The course will examine the writings of classical/modern Japanese/Japanese American women writers within their local/global settings focusing on what they wrote, why they wrote, and where they wrote. The course will also explore how local/global gender and race politics inform these writings—and their reception—and look at the ways these formulations (which have crossed back and forth across the Pacific from the earliest Japanese immigration to the U.S. through international exchanges to this day) continue to fashion the writings of these women writers.

MS 100AA. Asian Americans in Media.
M.Ma, PZ, TR 2:45-4:00 p.m. and T 7:00p.m.
This is a historical survey of Asian American involvement in media production, beginning with the silent film era and ending with contemporary projects in film, video, and new media. In this course, we will focus on the shifting yet continuous participation of Asians in the production of media in North America, and look at how changing political, social, and cultural discourses have shaped media representations of Asians throughout this period.

PSYC 155. Seminar in Ethnic Minority Psychology and Mental Health.
W.Hwang, CMC, MW 2:45-4:00 p.m.
This course examines the roles and influences of ethnicity, race, and culture on psychology and mental health.  Students will learn about intergroup dynamics, racism and White privilege, ethnic identity development, acculturation and immigration, ethnic differences in the expression of distress, differential patterns and barriers to help-seeking, mental health disparities, and ethnocultural issues that influence treatment processes.

THEA 001G. Acting for Social Change.
J.Lu, PO, TR 1:15-3:45 p.m.
Acting for Social Change is an introduction to the fundamentals of acting, drawing upon different techniques such as psychological realism and physical theatre. Students will perform a self-written monologue, a documentary monologue transcribed from a live interview, and a two or three person scene from a play. They will also be introduced to Playback Theatre and Theatre of the Oppressed, two forms of theater that are applied commonly today to create dialogue, heal conflict and trauma, and build community.

THEA 115M. Race and Contemporary Performance.
J.Lu, PO, TR 9:35-10:50 a.m.
What is race and how does the meaning attached to racial categories shape culture and social structures in the United States?  This course will examine how individuals and groups use their bodies and minds to identify, dis-identify, imagine and re-imagine racial dynamics on the America via drama and performance.